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Surprising Variations
Fixed Focus

THOMAS LEER 1979

CD album | gg237
Thomas Leer is a key figure in the British electronic and Industrial scene. His album "The Bridge", together with Robert Rental, was released by Industrial Records in 1979 and is today seen as a landmark album from that era. Thomas later went on to record more pop influenced music with releases such as "Contradictions" on Cherry Red and "The Scale of Ten" on Arista. In the second half of the 1980s he formed the duo Act together with Propaganda's Claudia Brücken. From time to time, Thomas Leer surprises his fans with new music, sometimes also with archive stuff. The album "1979", originally available as a digital download only on his bandcamp page, presents his earliest explorations into the world of electronics. These earlies songs have previously never seen the light of day. Klanggalerie are now happy to release them as a CD, collected, mastered, and with a 14th bonus track that wasn't available on the digital release. The full track list is: 1. Semi Detatched Suicide 2. Torment Weekly 3. Surprising Variations 4. Crossmaglen 5. Fixed Focus 6. Structures 7. Monorail 8. Back Of The Mind 9. HIgh Rise 10. Urbain 11. Crouch End 12. Never Met An Actress 13. Ad Astra 14. Sleepless Nights. Price: € 16,-/copy incl worldwide shipping. Low stock!

Thomas Leers place upon the pinnacle of the late seventies electronic music movement is unassailable.  Not quite singlehandedly, but as much as anyone could be, the Port Glasgow native was barely out of his teens when he released his first single, “Private Plane,” in 1978, and he followed through with the music featured here. (...) “Never Met an Actress” is hard and harsh. “Crouch End” is a suburban cityscape reduced to its component melodies; the eight minute “Urbain” is a teasing, tormenting cyber-waltz, interrupted with what may or may not be curious fingers, pressing buttons just to see what theyll do. (...) And then there is “Crossmaglen,” named for one of the most notorious trouble spots in the ongoing struggles in Northern Ireland, and as foreboding as it ought to be. The sounds of warfare are forever whispering beneath a simple soundscape, while Leers voice conveys a distance and alienation that makes Gary Numan sound like he’s reading bedtime stories. And then there’s “Crossmaglen,” named for one of the most notorious trouble spots in the ongoing struggles in Northern Ireland, and as foreboding as it ought to be.  The sounds of warfare are forever whispering beneath a simple soundscape, while Leer’s voice conveys a distance and alienation that makes Gary Numan sound like he’s reading bedtime stories. 1979 is a magnificent album, one that pushes boundaries that few people even knew existed at the time.  And today, we are so accustomed to their destruction that we’re still not aware they were there.
(Goldmine Magazine, July 2017)